Security Engineering Needs a P&I Diagram

Why we should finally build a system model that helps with our security engineering (and how the Layered Blueprints got their name)

Photo by ThisisEngineering RAEng on Unsplash
Image 1: CAD drawing, source: johannes-vatterschule.de
Image 2: Circuit diagram, source: bestengineeringprojects.com
Image 3: Block diagram, source: Alex Veprik
Image 4: Piping and instrumentation (P&I) diagram, source: enggcyclopedia.com
Image 5: How Layered Blueprints got their name: Relation between a proceudre model for security engineering (left) and a system model für security engineering (middle). The system model begins with a simple blueprint and gains information with each layer while working through the procedure model.

Or, in brief: Without automation engineering, no one would need automation security engineering.

Or, in brief: Without process engineering, no one would need process control engineering.

Image 6: P&I diagram of a tank (left) and a control valve (right). Symbols are standardized in ISO 10628–2:2012.
Image 7: The same P&I diagram with added measurement and control functions (PCE requests): Level indicating sensor (“LI”), actuator for the control valve (“YS”), and automatic control function (“UIC”). Depiction and letter codes are standardized in standard series ISO 3511 (soon-to-be ISO 14617 and ISO 15519), ANSI/ISA-5.1–2009, and IEC 62424.

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Friction generates heat — true for writing and engineering. Fluchsfriction generates writings on security engineering. Heated debates welcome! CTO@admeritia

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Sarah Fluchs

Friction generates heat — true for writing and engineering. Fluchsfriction generates writings on security engineering. Heated debates welcome! CTO@admeritia